Thursday, August 22, 2019

Danish borders we have known





Who knew that the present era,
such as it is, might come to be
defined by that Kierkegaardrail
against expansive idiocy, that
Danish aperçu-to-go with coffee,
the absurd. A pity, that from a
Queens so awash in Danish pastry,
a politician should have emerged
to stalk the earth with ignorance
as phosphorescent as his hair, on-
ly to gain his comeuppance from a
better of her territorial integ-
rity than to cede it, McConnell-
ishly, to his silly bluster. It
wasn't so much that his nation
had furnished no rejoinder, that
set the morning papers abuzz to
that when it finally did arrive,
it should have tripped so obvious-
ly and irrefutably from a culture
not known for power plays at all.

Ladies' Javelin aside, of course.


























Monday, August 19, 2019

Rued, the boat





You think Britain has it bad, to
be led by a PM of iridescent dis-
regard for the realities of Brex-
it? America has a similarly dyed
without fibbing. But think of poor
Bogey, sparring with Claude Rains
on the patio at Rick's, having to
claim he migrated to Casablanca
for the waters, against Rains' re-
joinder that there aren't any. On-
ly in the movies, is it endearing
to confess, I was misinformed. Or
does that line survive so well, be-

















Sunday, August 18, 2019

Khaki sempervirens





  I don't know why I think the green
  that is so congenital in khaki is,
  in any way, elusive. It may please
  me to be so, but it will be there.






















Lynn Bystrom
Gray Wolf
Getty Images©






Friday, August 16, 2019

Suppose it were Friday clxxviii: And one forgot to go to the bank





    That's not so bad.
    There's always the
    movie.





      



    
















Anthony Perkins
  and Janet Leigh
Shamley Productions
  at Universal Studios
Alfred Hitchcock
  producer-director
Psycho
1960








Thursday, August 15, 2019

Šli and the family stone






The upper Adriatic is not the most
fertile setting for dreaming up a
tease for the American president,
but that's where the esteemed col-
umnist for The New York Times, by
way of the internet, found one at
an hour I will not mention. Still,
to read Gail Collins by the dawn's
early light would be such a tonic
for those who stay up in the dark
to cavort in her latest fantasy, I
feel others may follow one's lead.

Her latest foray into presidential
interaction is so promising in its
particulars, and flawless in expres-
sion, that I commend it without a
single excerpt to spoil a delicious
sequencing of inspired irritants. If
you are not too elderly to withstand
the occasional ribald allusion, the
whole tenor of the thing encourages
being read to the tides, high or low.



















Gail Collins
How to torture Trump
  Who's less popular than
  Elton John?
The New York Times
August 14, 2019




Sunday, August 11, 2019

Sunday nibbled sleeve xi: Frank Bruni and vituperation





Columnists seem to be writing much
more about their personal lives and
their families these days, than be-
fore. I mean, I know that like Frank
Bruni, Liebling liked to eat, but in
skewering a hypocrite I'd say their
difference is telling. In his col-
umn of this weekend, Bruni defends
the sovereignty of his sexuality
without failing to touch upon fear
for a remaining eye and love for his 
mother. I don't know about Liebling,
but I think hypocrisy fared no bet-
ter for his omission of these facts.























Their difference must be found in
triumphs Bruni has achieved, to ad-
dress hypocrisy with pitilessness.
He gives it the grammatically pre-
carious term, hate, but it's plain-
ly a failure of faith that he means.

Shakespeare avoided this confusion
with Caesar, and Liebling with Long.
His are insights of a double-edged 
kind. But who doesn't need to work
on the precariousness of the senses
when the passions are their author?


























Frank Bruni
Hate is so much big-
  ger than Trump
The New York Times
August 10, 2019

Farrow & Ball
Picture Gallery Red
  and Mahogany No. 36
Dorset, England






Saturday, August 10, 2019

High tide of hope






At last, the virulent storm that
seemed to emanate from the White
House has been shown to swirl in
our continental sea as a lurking
permanent dread of status asphy-
xiation. Were you alive when the
last Texan to be President, pro-
claimed the end of history, when
those office towers were downed?

If he was right, then is the week
just passed a rebirth of history?















Friday, August 9, 2019

Suppose it were Friday clxxvii: And one awoke in an Edward Hopper






   It's not only the weather
   that strikes the tone for
   one's day. But it can al-
   most always be seductive.









































Henri Cartier-Bresson
Telegraph Hill
undated